Top 13 Money Drains For College Students

Top 13 Money Drains for College Students

1. Starbucks (nope)
2. World of Warcraft (nope)
3. Credit Cards (nope but that student line of credit kills!)
4. New computer (I already had a decent laptop but had to buy a new printer and a few other gadgety accessories – still, not too bad)
5. Software (definitely not – it's a free world baby!)
6. Booze (and how!)
7. Vending Machines (not so much but the Timmy's/Grad Club food was way too convenient way too often)
8. Books (for library school?  As if.)
9. Eating Out (yeah, that's always been my weakness – whether I was in school or not)
10. Clothing (getting a real job was a much bigger hit on the ol' wardrobe.  No more jeans & t-shirts unfortunately)
11. Spring Break (we didn't have spring break in the Grad Program but Shea and I did a pretty major trip for each of our three breaks for the year – Montreal after first semester, a loop around Lake Erie through Ohio after second and back to Saskatchewan after my final semester – so yeah, this was one of our biggest expenses of the year while back in school)
12. Cars (we didn't have our car in Ontario but rented one every 4-6 weeks.  I still think we saved money doing it this way.)
13. Dating (nah, we're married! )

Comments 18

  1. Anonymous wrote:

    See Starbucks was a biggie while I was in London, however, I think it all balances out with my savings as a result of being a teetotaler 😉
    Other than that, eating at school was a drain but you've gotta eat right?
    No World of Warcraft..no credit card debt really (amen on the line of credit though), I had my computer, I had my software, wasn't a big vending machine girl, yeah…didn't read many books in liberry school…I always buy clothes on sale..always…I don't drive and as for spring break and dating, I also had no life in library school, so really..it was starbucks…oh…and Western. 😛

    Posted 13 Nov 2007 at 5:35 pm
  2. Anonymous wrote:

    5. Software (definitely not – it's a free world baby!)
    I'm starting the MLIS program at UWO in January and I've been running Linux and free software exclusively since 1997. I'm reluctant to move to Windows. From point (5) in your post, it sounds possible to get through the MLIS program without installing all sorts of proprietary, Windows-only software. Is this true?

    Posted 13 Nov 2007 at 8:29 pm
  3. Anonymous wrote:

    Well, I managed to get through it with a Mac. 🙂 There is the occasional need for Windows software, but – the FIMS labs are open 24/7 (with your keycard). Those computers have lots of software preinstalled and MLIS students have installation privileges (amazingly enough!), so if you need to install something you can.
    (There is even a Mac lab hidden away in a Sekrit Location in NCB, which I heard rumours of in my second term, and actually came across in my third. Needless to say, it is not included in the orientation tour, and few folk even know of its existence. *amused*)

    Posted 14 Nov 2007 at 7:04 am
  4. Anonymous wrote:

    There is the occasional need for Windows software, but – the FIMS labs are open 24/7 (with your keycard).
    May I ask which software in particular? If it's just office stuff, then I'm fine with OpenOffice (which can import/export MS Office documents really well). But if it's more esoteric stuff, then I'm probably out of luck.
    Glad to hear that people are getting by on Macs, too. Being a long-time Linux user, I like the fact that MacOS X is UNIX-based!

    Posted 14 Nov 2007 at 3:04 pm
  5. Anonymous wrote:

    Not office stuff; they don't care what you use for that. Well, mostly not – I think for one exercise in web design we were told to use OpenOffice, but that's hardly a problem. 🙂 I also remember using Camtasia in web usability class, and SPSS in 504 (though I'm not sure they do that in every 504 class; mine might have been an anomaly). Then there was a Linuxy assignment in 525 – taught by Gord Nickerson, who's a Linux/Mac geek 🙂 – which involved creating a live CD of the Linux distro of your choice. (I had Issues with that one, and couldn't get a PPC version to work with my iMac – I finally ended up doing it with an Intel distro in the computer labs. So I give it an honourary mention here, as it was something I needed the labs for…)
    Anyway, the assignments for which I did need special software were pretty few and far between! Those are all I can think of (and if I'd stuck to the less techie courses for my electives, the only time I'd've needed to use the labs would have been for SPSS.)
    Yay OS X! 🙂

    Posted 15 Nov 2007 at 5:09 am
  6. Anonymous wrote:

    I also remember using Camtasia in web usability class, and SPSS in 504 (though I'm not sure they do that in every 504 class; mine might have been an anomaly).
    Looks like there's a Linux version of SPSS (which they tested on both Red Hat and Debian distros – very nice of them).
    No such luck for Camtasia, but that's okay.
    I think for one exercise in web design we were told to use OpenOffice, but that's hardly a problem.
    Then there was a Linuxy assignment in 525 – taught by Gord Nickerson, who's a Linux/Mac geek
    Sounds like I'll feel right at home in this program.

    Posted 15 Nov 2007 at 8:06 pm
  7. Anonymous wrote:

    I'm a bit late to the party but yeah, between the computer labs (if you absolutely need to use Microsucks applications) and the adaptability of OpenOffice and other open source applications, you should be fine.
    I'm not too familiar with OpenOffice's PowerPoint equivalent, Impress, but that might be the biggest one that you need to confirm compliance with since no one will know if the print report you hand in was done in Word or the OpenOffice equivalent. But for presentations (of which, you will have many), you're using the software that's on the machines in the classrooms (unless you can create an executable – again, I'm not too familiar with that particular software.)
    Good luck with the program – hope this blog has helped give you some hint about what to expect. Feel free to drop me a line anytime you have questions. I'd love to hear your impressions of the program as well.

    Posted 15 Nov 2007 at 10:43 pm
  8. Anonymous wrote:

    Right. Nobody sits and drinks eight pints of Starbucks coffee – at least, as far as I know. Wellington Dark Ale on the other hand…

    Posted 15 Nov 2007 at 10:45 pm
  9. Anonymous wrote:

    Just wanted to add my ditto that having installation privileges was very cool and useful – getting Firefox set-up with all the extensions and add-ons that I prefer was sweet, sticking on some freeware apps I've come to rely on, etc.

    Posted 15 Nov 2007 at 10:46 pm
  10. Anonymous wrote:

    I think we were an anomaly with that SPSS assignment – Frank as much as said so if I remember correctly.
    I'll second Gord Nickerson as a prof worth taking classes from – excellent!

    Posted 15 Nov 2007 at 10:49 pm
  11. Anonymous wrote:

    Er, and most of my comments are out of order for some unknown reason (well, not responding to other people's comments in an orderly fashion probably has something to do with it.)

    Posted 15 Nov 2007 at 10:51 pm
  12. Anonymous wrote:

    That's a good point; for presentations you'll probably have to use PowerPoint on the classroom computers. Mind you, in principle I don't see any reason why one couldn't just bring the portable version of OpenOffice along on a little USB drive and run a presentation off of that – but it would probably be too much trouble for group presentations, and presentations mostly are group projects in this program. Still, you could certainly prepare your slides in OpenOffice (and usually someone in the group volunteers to put all the slides together in a single PowerPoint file, with a consistent look-and-feel – so all you'd have to do is email that person the plain unformatted slides, which would neatly avoid any possible formatting translation issues.)

    Posted 16 Nov 2007 at 7:28 am
  13. Anonymous wrote:

    I'm not too worried about OpenOffice's PowerPoint equivalent, Impress. I've used it at work and have found that it now exports quite well to PPT format – at least in my experience.

    Posted 16 Nov 2007 at 7:55 pm
  14. Anonymous wrote:

    Good luck with the program – hope this blog has helped give you some hint about what to expect.
    Let me just take a minute here to thank you for this blog, and the MLIS FAQ, and all the rest of the info that you've posted on this site. I've been working for the past 4 since graduation and going back to school was a decision that involved a lot of pondering. Reading through your posts has given me an excellent idea of what to expect.
    Feel free to drop me a line anytime you have questions. I'd love to hear your impressions of the program as well.
    Thanks! I'll be sure to let you know if there are any changes to the program, too.

    Posted 16 Nov 2007 at 8:03 pm
  15. Anonymous wrote:

    No problem. I'm glad you found it useful and as I said to another incoming student who came across my blog, that was a big part of the reason I chose library school as a main topic when I started it.
    I had *so* many questions about the program before I started and was lucky to know a few alumni because of the type of work I was involved in (literary non-profit organizations.) But I know a lot of students don't necessarily have those connections. Or I might cover a topic that they didn't think to ask about if they do.

    Posted 18 Nov 2007 at 3:39 pm
  16. Anonymous wrote:

    I assumed as much but I'm glad you confirmed it. Not sure if you've heard of it or not but there's an open source integrated library system named Koha (http://www.koha.org) that you might want to check out before you get to library school. It came up the odd time in different classes and is the type of thing we probably should've heard about more.

    Posted 18 Nov 2007 at 3:42 pm
  17. Anonymous wrote:

    That's a whole other (weird) issue – the group dynamics of “who gets to put the presentation together…” Of course, admittedly I did it for pretty much every group presentation I was involved in. But I'm also a control freak of the highest order so there you go. 😉

    Posted 18 Nov 2007 at 3:49 pm
  18. Anonymous wrote:

    Muchas gracias! I'll definitely check out Koha before school starts.

    Posted 19 Nov 2007 at 3:24 pm
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